20. Reno 911!: Miami

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The first of a few TV comedies to graduate to feature-length, Reno 911! brings its Comedy Central cops to the beaches of Miami. And in accordance with Miami's Law, a convention center that CAN be targeted for a biological attack WILL be targeted for a biological attack. Lieutenant Dangle and company bumble their way to success in an 80-minute episode that reads as a love letter to fans of the show -- and maybe as a ransom note to those unfamiliar.



19. ParaNorman

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ParaNorman did a little bit of everything: 3D, stop-motion animation, comedy AND horror. Plus, a very surprising coming-out from the film's 18-year-old jock, voiced by Casey Affleck. It has all the makings of a classic children's movie (that's enjoyable for every other age, as well): ghosts, an actual witch hunt, sudden death, and adolescent camaraderie in the face of zombie adversity.



18. Black Dynamite

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You don't see an American blaxploitation action comedy film every day -- or ever. That's what makes Black Dynamite a special addition to this list and to the pantheon of American films where President Richard Nixon is defeated in a kung-fu battle. (Still the only one?) What makes Black Dynamite really pop is how effortless the parody is: everything just feels dyna-right.



17. Hail, Caesar!

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The Coen Brothers are the kings of detail and should be hailed for their very specific send-up of post-war Hollywood. This all-star comedy stars all the stars: George Clooney, Josh Brolin, Scarlett Johanson, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton and even Channing Tatum. It's the perfect marriage of silly and sophisticated in the Hollywood studio system, and has the weird, meandering shaggy nature that some of the best Coen Bros. films sport. It doesn't make for the most memorable story, but it's a fun ride.



16. Burn After Reading

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There are as many Coen brothers' movies on this list as there are Coen brothers (two, if we had to guess.) The Co-bros know how to get dark. Really dark. Like, shoot-Brad-Pitt-in-a-closet dark. But before they taketh away, they giveth us (read: the Internet) this:

The great part of the film is that it's ostensibly about the intelligence community in Washington DC, but every single character is too stupid, uninformed, or distracted to realize what's going on - which leads to one of the most bizarre and incredible endings of any film ever - JK Simmons desperately trying to understand what ANYONE in the film was actually trying to accomplish: